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Beretta Pricing and Reference

Beretta Pricing and Reference/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f376d27b5cca_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f376d27b5cca_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } From the Standard Catalog of Firearms Know what your Beretta firearms are worth with this up-to-date 37-page .PDF download from the Standard Catalog of Firearms. * Completely updated pricing for Beretta firearms with new entries and photos * Value Trackers: Real-life auction results * Sleeper Alerts: Collectible guns that are outpacing the market * Links to manufacturers’ website Learn pricing and values for these Beretta firearms: Beretta Black Diamond Field Grade – Grade One Beretta Black "Diamond Field Grade" – Grade Two Beretta Black Diamond Field Grade – Grade Three Beretta Black Diamond Field Grade – Grade Four Beretta Gamma Standard Beretta Gamma Deluxe Beretta Gamma Target Beretta America Standard Beretta America Deluxe Beretta Europa Beretta Europa Deluxe Beretta Francia Standard Beretta Alpha Three Beretta Beta Three Beretta Model 1915 "Beretta Model 1915" /1919 Beretta Model 1919 Beretta Model 1923 Beretta Model 1931 Beretta Model 1934 "Beretta Model 1934" Rumanian Contract Beretta Model 318 Beretta Model 418 Beretta Model 420 Beretta Model 420 Beretta Model 421 Beretta Model 948 Beretta Model 949 Olympic Target Beretta U22 Neos 4.5/6.0 Beretta U22 Neos 4.5 Inox/6.0 Inox Beretta U22 Neos 6.0/7.5 DLX Beretta U22 Neos 6.0/7.5 Inox DLX Beretta 70 Series Beretta Model 70 (Model 100) Beretta Model 70S Beretta Model 71/Jaguar (Model 101) Beretta Model 72 Beretta Model 76 (102) Beretta Model 950/Jetfire Beretta Model 950B/Jetfire Beretta Model 950 Jetfire Inox Beretta Model 3032 Tomcat "Beretta Model 3032" Tomcat Inox Beretta Model 3032 Tomcat Titanium Beretta Alley Cat Beretta Model 951 Beretta Model 20 Beretta Model 21/21 Bobcat Beretta Model 21EL Beretta Model 21 Inox Beretta Model 90 Beretta Model 92 Beretta Model 92SB-P Beretta Model 92FS Beretta Model 92FS Inox Beretta Model 96 Beretta Model 96 Combat Beretta Model 96 Stock Beretta Model 92/96FS Inox Beretta Model 92/96FS Centurion Beretta Model 92FS/96 Brigadier Beretta Model 92FS/96 Brigadier Inox Beretta Model 92G-SD/96G-SD Beretta Model 92F Beretta Model 92F Compact Beretta Model 92/96 Compact “Type M” Beretta Model 92/96M Compact Inox Beretta Model 92D Compact Type M Beretta Model 92FS Deluxe Beretta Model 92FS “470th Anniversary” Limited Edition Beretta Model 92/96D Beretta Model 92/96DS Beretta Model 92G/96G Beretta Model 92/96 Vertec Beretta Model 92 Competition Conversion Kit Beretta Model 92/96 Combo Beretta Model M9 Limited Edition Beretta Standard Model Beretta Model 92 Billennium Beretta Model 92 Steel-I Beretta Model M9A1 Beretta Model 92G/96G Elite Beretta Model 92G Elite II Beretta Model 92/96 Border Marshall Beretta Model 92/96 Custom Carry Beretta Model 92FS Inox Tactical Beretta Model 8000/8040/8045 Cougar "Beretta Model 8000" /8040/8045 Mini Cougar Beretta Model 8000F-Cougar L Beretta Model 9000F Beretta Model 9000D Beretta Model 9000S Beretta Model 84/Cheetah Beretta Model 84BB Beretta Model 85/Cheetah Beretta Model 86/Cheetah Beretta Model 87/Cheetah Beretta Model 87 Target Beretta Model 89/Gold Standard Beretta Model Px4 Storm Pistol, Type F Beretta 90-Two Beretta Stampede Blue Beretta Stampede Nickel Beretta Stampede Deluxe Beretta Stampede Bisley Beretta Laramie Beretta Cx4 Storm Beretta AR-70 Beretta BM-59 Standard Grade Beretta Model 500 Custom Beretta Model 501 Beretta Model 502 Beretta Mato Deluxe Beretta Mato Standard Beretta Model S689 Sable Beretta SSO Express Beretta SSO5 Express Beretta SSO6 Beretta SSO6 EELL Beretta Model 455 Beretta Model 455 EELL Beretta BL-1 Beretta BL-2 Beretta BL-2/S (Speed Trigger) Beretta BL-2 Stakeout Beretta BL-3 Beretta BL-3 Competition Beretta BL-4 Beretta BL-4 Competition Beretta BL-5 Beretta BL-5 Competition Beretta BL-6 Beretta BL-6 Competition Beretta Model S55 B Beretta Model S56 E Beretta Model S58 Competition Beretta Silver Snipe Beretta Golden Snipe Beretta Model 57 E Beretta ASEL Model Beretta Model 409 PB Beretta Model 410 Beretta Model 410 E Beretta Model 411 E Beretta Model 424 Beretta Model 426 E Beretta Model 625 Beretta Silver Hawk Beretta Model 470 Silver Hawk Beretta Model "470 Silver Hawk" EL Beretta 471 Silver Hawk Beretta Model SO-1 Beretta Model SO-2 Beretta Model SO-3 Beretta Model SO-4 (Garcia SO-3 EELL) Beretta Model SO-5 (Garcia SO-3 EELL) Beretta Model SO-6 (450 or 451 EL Side-by-Side Beretta Model SO-7 (451 EELL) Side-by-Side Beretta SO-5 Trap Beretta SO-5 Trap 2 BBL Set Beretta SO-5 Sporting Clays Beretta SO-5 Skeet Beretta SO-6 EL Beretta SO-6 Trap Beretta SO-6 Skeet Beretta SO-Sporting Clays Beretta SO-6 EELL Beretta SO-6 EESS Beretta SO-7 Beretta SO-9 Beretta Jubilee Field Grade (Giubileo) Beretta Jubilee Sporting Grade Beretta Jubilee II (Giublio) Beretta ASE Deluxe Sporting Beretta Model 687 EELL Gallery Special Beretta Imperiale Montecarlo Beretta Diana Beretta Model 451 Series Beretta Model 450 Series Beretta Model 452 Beretta Model 452 EELL Beretta Onyx Beretta Onyx Waterfowl 3.5 Beretta White Onyx Beretta Onyx Pro Beretta Onyx Pro 3.5 Beretta Model 682/682 Gold Beretta Model 682 Skeet Beretta 682 4 BBL Set Beretta Super Sporting/682 Gold Sporting Ported Beretta 682 Sporting/ "682 Gold Sporting" Beretta 682 Sporting Combo Beretta 682 Super Trap Beretta 682 Top Single Super Trap Beretta 682 Top Combo Super Trap Beretta 682 Trap Beretta 682 Top Single Trap Beretta 682 Mono Combo Trap Beretta 682 Top Combo Beretta 682 Gold Trap with Adjustable Stock Beretta 682 Gold Skeet with Adjustable Stock Beretta 682 Gold “Live Bird” Beretta S682 Gold E Trap "Beretta S682 Gold" E Trap Combo Beretta S682 Gold E Skeet Beretta S682 Gold E Sporting Beretta Model 685 Beretta Model 686/686 Silver Perdiz Sporting Beretta Model 686 Essential/Silver Essential Beretta 686 Ultra Light Onyx Beretta 686 Onyx Beretta Onyx 2 BBL Set Beretta 686 Silver Receiver Beretta 686 L/ "686 Silver Perdiz" Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon Beretta "686 Silver Pigeon" Sporting Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon Trap (30”) Beretta Silver Pigeon Trap Top Mono (32” or 34”) Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon S Beretta 686E Sporting Beretta 686 EL/Gold Perdiz Beretta 686 Hunter Sport Beretta 686 Onyx Hunter Sport Beretta 686 Whitewing Beretta 686 Blackwing Beretta 686 Sporting Combo Beretta 686 Collection Trap Beretta 686 Collection Sport Beretta 686 Quail Unlimited 2002 Covey Limited Edition Beretta 686 Ringneck Pheasants Forever Beretta Ultralight Beretta Ultralight Deluxa Beretta Model 687/687 Silver Pigeon Sporting Beretta 687 L/ Silver Pigeon Beretta "687 Silver Pigeon" II Beretta 687 Silver Pigeon Sporting Beretta 687 Silver Pigeon II Sporting "Beretta Silver Pigeon" S Beretta Silver Pigeon S Combo Beretta 687 Sporting Combo Beretta 687 Silver Pigeon IV Beretta 687 Silver Pigeon V Beretta 687 EL 687 Gold Pigeon Beretta 687 EL Gold Pigeon Sporting Beretta 687 EELL Diamond Pigeon Beretta 687 EELL Diamond Pigeon Skeet Beretta 687 EELL Diamond Pigeon Sporting Beretta 687 EELL Trap Beretta 687 EELL Top Combo Beretta Model 687 EELL King Ranch Beretta Model 626 Field Grade Beretta 626 Onyx Beretta 626 Onyx Beretta 627 EL Beretta 627 EELL Beretta Model FS-1 Beretta TR-1 Trap Beretta TR-2 Trap Beretta Mark II Trap Beretta Model ASE 90/Gold Series Beretta ASE 90 Pigeon Beretta ASE 90 Trap Beretta ASE 90 Gold X Trap Combo Beretta ASE 90 Skeet Beretta ASE 90 Sporting Clay Beretta Model SL-2 Beretta Silver Pigeon Beretta Gold Pigeon Beretta Ruby Pigeon Beretta DT 10 Trident Trap Beretta DT 10 Trident Trap Combo Top Beretta DT 10 Trident Trap Bottom Single Beretta DT 10 Trident Skeet Beretta DT 10 Trident Sporting Beretta SV10 Perennia Beretta AL-1 Beretta AL-2 Beretta AL-2 Competition Beretta AL-2 Magnum Beretta AL-3 Beretta Al-3 Deluxe Trap Beretta Model 301 Beretta Model 1200 Field Grade "Beretta Model 1200" Magnum Beretta Model 1200 Riot Beretta Model 1201 Beretta Riot Model Beretta Model 302 Beretta Model 302 Super Lusso Beretta Model Vittoria/Pintail Beretta ES100 Pintail Rifled Slug Beretta ES100 Rifled Slug Beretta ES100 Rifled Slug Combo Beretta ES100 NWTF Special Camo Beretta Model A-303 Beretta Model A-303 Upland Beretta Model A-303 Sporting Clay Beretta Model A-303 Competition (Trap or Skeet) Beretta Model A-303 Slug Gun Beretta Model A-303 Youth Gun Beretta Model A-303 Ducks Unlimited Beretta Model AL390 Mallard Series Field Grade Beretta Model AL390 Mallard Series Slug Gun Beretta Model AL390 Mallard Series Synthetic Stock Beretta Model AL390 Mallard Series Camouflage Beretta Deluxe Grade/Gold Mallard Beretta AL390 Trap Beretta AL390 Super Trap Beretta AL390 Skeet Beretta AL390 Super Skeet Beretta AL390 Sporting Beretta AL390 Sport Gold Sporting Beretta AL390 Sport Sporting Youth Beretta AL390 NWTF Special Youth Beretta AL390 "Sport Sporting Youth" Collection Beretta AL390 Sport Diamond Sporting Beretta AL390 Camo Beretta Waterfowl/Turkey Model Beretta NWTF Special Camo Beretta NWTF Special Synthetic Beretta Super Trap Beretta Super Skeet Beretta Model 3901 "Beretta Model 3901" RL Beretta Model 3901 Camo Beretta Model 3901 Citizen Beretta Model 3901 Statesman Beretta Model 3901 Ambassador Beretta Model 3901 Target RL Beretta AL 391 Urika Beretta AL 391 Urika Synthetic Beretta AL 391 Urika Camo Beretta AL 391 Urika Gold Beretta AL 391 Urika Youth Beretta AL 391 Urika Sporting Beretta AL "391 Urika Gold" Sporting Beretta AL 391 Urika Trap Beretta AL 391 Urika Gold Trap Beretta AL 391 Urika Parallel Target RL/SL Beretta Urika Optima Beretta Urika Synthetic Optima "Beretta Urika Optima" Camo Beretta AL 391 Urika 2 X-Tra Grain Beretta AL 391 Urika 2 Gold Beretta AL 391 Urika 2 Kick-Off Beretta AL 391 Urika 2 Sporting X-Tra Grain Beretta AL 391 Urika 2 Gold Parallel Target Beretta AL 391 Covey Beretta AL 391 Ringneck Beretta AL 391 Teknys Beretta AL 391 Teknys Gold Beretta AL "391 Teknys Gold" Target Beretta AL 391 Teknys King Ranch Beretta AL 391 Xtrema 3.5 Beretta A391 Xtrema2 "Beretta A391 Xtrema2" Slug Gun Beretta UGB25 XCEL

ETS AR 15 Magazines Two is One for a very fast reload

ETS AR 15 Magazines  Two is One for a very fast reload

ETS magazines are pretty cool. If you’ve never heard of them you’ve probably seen them. They make clear polymer magazines for Glock pistols and AR 15s. Today we are looking at the ETS AR 15 magazines. These polymer magazines have a unique design that allows them to latch together. I’m sure you’ve seen magazine couplers, ETS AR 15 magazines do the same thing, minus the coupler. ETS AR 15 Magazines Both sides of the ETS AR 15 magazines are outfitted with a series of half circles. These half circles allow you to snap the magazines together. ETS didn’t create this design, HK G-36 magazines were the first I’ve seen to do this. (I.E. Chuck Norris in Expendables 3) However, bringing it to the AR platform in an affordable and easy to use package. These magazines are made entirely in the United States and are translucent. The bottom is outfitted with a pretty robust magazine take down button that looks pretty awesome to boot. The magazine is textured with ribbing, and the interlocking circles add some texture as well. Locking The lock in place pretty easily and do it projectile upwards. The whole jungle taped thing with projectiles facing downwards looks cool in pics with Malcolm X but isn’t the wise way to go. Conventional wisdom says the less dirt in your magazine the better it works. With the jungle taped magazines whenever you get in the prone position one of your mags will be face down in the dirt. Theoretically, you can just keep attaching ETS AR 15 magazines to each other into absurdity. However, two mags in the common sense limit, anything more and the weapons gets heavier and heavier. Range Hot On the range, the ETS AR 15 magazines proved two things. First off, they are reliable. (So far, subject to change.) The second thing they proved is they are truly only designed for the AR 15. Due to the design of firearms like the Scar and Tavor the magazines will not lock into place when paired together. For example, on the Scar there is a nub on the left side of the receiver that blocks the mag from locking when paired. On the right side, the magazine release is covered and pressed by paired magazines. Without being paired the magazines work fine in any weapon that accepts AR 15 magazines. I’d imagine AR 15s with flared mag wells would also be an issue with these magazines. No go for the Scar The ETS AR 15 magazines were tested alongside the Hexmag Advanced Tactical grip. Both have seen a hundred rounds each and have worked so far. A hundred rounds isn’t much, but typically it’s enough to know if its crap or not. I plan to do a large scale torture and durability test with a variety of mags in the coming future so stay tuned. They also do not drop free by any stretch of the imagination. Hit the release button and they hardly budge. At first, I was like this is bull. I’ve been using Lancer mags and they drop free without issue so maybe I’m spoiled? However, upon consideration, it makes sense they don’t drop free. If they dropped free you may hit that button when you’ve tethered two magazines and send your full extra mag to the ground with your empty mag. That roughly 1.5 pounds of loaded magazine would be gone before you even realized your mistake. Instead, when you hit the button the magazine basically stays put and allows you to grip, rip, and reload with your tethered ETS AR 15 magazine. Concepts Count The entire idea of tethering two magazines together can be divisive if you look at it in one way or another. In general, it makes the weapon heavier, and weight can be an issue. It’s also impossible to find a magazine pouch short of a SAW drum pouch to store them. Also, some clamps are complete garbage and the magazine can be fly loose when jumping, climbing, or even running. The ETS AR 15 magazines solve one and a half of these problems. There is no clamp to fail. If the magazines fail they have been twisted to an extreme and it will be noticeable. That or the ETS AR 15 magazines have broken. The lack of a clamp means these magazines can be divided easily enough to store in pouches and combined, or separated when convenient. This half solves that problem. Where they Shine These magazines shine is being used for home defense. If you choose to use a rifle for home defense a reload may not ever be needed, but it’s comforting to have. Especially when you consider that magazines do fail and having an extra on hand is handy Most of us don’t have load bearing gear ready to go, so an extra mag attached to our weapon gives a ready and convenient reload. Alternatively, from a Marine’s perspective, they could be pretty useful for the IAR gunner in a squad. One their duties is to help the squad gain fire superiority. As a machine gunner by trade, I preferred the belt fed weapon’s system to do so. Since Marine rifle squads are now replacing belt fed LMGs with automatic rifles they need a little boost for fire superiority. The ETS AR 15 magazines give the IAR gunner 30 extra rounds on tap that can be used after their first thirty is fired. Overall Overall the design is unique and seems well thought out when you consider how the magazines work. Are they for everything? No. But in a few roles they shine well, ad they work well, so what else can be said? If you are interested ETS AR 15 magazines retail for around 15 bucks and their website is here. Special thank you to HD Targets and HDTargets.com for providing the targets for this article’s range day

Gun Collecting: Vintage Paintball Guns

Gun Collecting: Vintage Paintball Guns

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2eccfb5_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2eccfb5_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } There is an interesting development happening in the gun world and it resembles what has occurred in other shooting sports: a move back to the retro.  In the sport of paintball,  there is a movement that is shying away from the newly developed rapid-fire, high-tech paintball guns.  These weapons throw out an enormous amount of paint downrange and have changed the sport for better or worse. There is Speedball where combatants shoot at each other in a McDonald's playland-like field of inflatable bunkers so the players don't get a boo-boo. And there is Woodsball where the players, as the name suggests, blast away at each other in the woods. This leads to stock-class paintball which is defined as, “Stock class aims to retain the way paintball was at its birth: before electronic markers, high rates of fire, and overshooting. Players often play stock class for different reasons: some grew up playing paintball this way and don't like the direction the industry has taken the sport, some play this way to save money, and some simply enjoy the challenge of not being able to rely on a fast marker to get eliminations. The common theme among all stock players, however, is a desire to play in a limited fashion. That is, to intentionally put oneself at a disadvantage in relation to other players on the field.” Related GunDigest Articles Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Gun Raffle to Support a School? Photo Gallery: 14 Amazing Engraved Guns of Gun Digest 2015 Stock-class paintball guns resemble the guns from the early days of the sport: they needed to be cocked, had a horizontal feed, and used a 12-gram gas powerlet. It forces the player to be more careful with taking a shot and puts more of an emphasis on stealth, strategy and all-around sneakiness. This is very similar to other shooting sports with intentional handicaps : the hunter that takes up muzzleloading; the archer that forgoes a compound and uses a recurve bow, or a clay pigeon shooter intentionally starting from the low-gun position rather than shouldering the shotgun before the call. All of those examples go back to the early days of the sport.

Have Mil Spec barrels become below average?

Have Mil Spec barrels become below average?

It’s a competitive market. Your choice for barrel companies has expanded exponentially since the AWB sunset. Who do you give your money to? We obviously have different shooting goals in mind, but a big part of the popularity of the AR belies its abilities as a do all rifle. The match 16 inch barrel is at home on the target range as it is capable of defending you and your loved ones in times of duress. For a long time the military has required a tough, chrome lined, 5.56 nato chambered rifle to ensure barrel longevity and reliability in combat conditions. For a long time, the civilian market has usurped the capabilities of traditional mil-spec barrels. Mil Spec Barrels are so Blasé… ? Let’s break down the problem. The Mil Spec barrel is capable of 1.5-2.0 minutes of angle and is built from tough steel to make sure it survives high volume fire and gives uncle sam a good use out of his money. The problem is that Mil-Spec barrels are not quite pertinent to civilians who may put several thousands down the pipe a year, and almost none in full automatic fire. As a civilian, the quality vs price of mil-spec barrels has been skewed by any number of barrel manufacturers who have produced low-cost, reliable, and very accurate barrels compared to the more expensive “better than mil-spec” cold hammer forged counterparts. Retailing at a whopping $289 for a naked DD barrel, and slapping you in the face at $300 plus dollars for a BCM pipe (with no gas tube, no gas block, nothing) it begs to question weather “mil-spec” or other high-end 5.56 “combat worthy” barrels are actually worth it to the civilian shooter. Here is a very good test done by MOLON at AR15.com. It highlights a 14.5 inch BCM barrel that retails for around $309 dollars. In this test, we see that the BCM barrel has some interesting groupings in that several shots are tight and touching, while others go wild. It all boils down to a 1.5-2 MOA barrel. People in the thread are taken back by the price for performance. In all honesty, the barrels accuracy is acceptable and certainly meets the militaries specs. Surely you can defend yourself with that barrel, and it’s a CHF barrel from a well respected manufacturer of solid rifles. It’s even capable of hitting a man sized target at 500+ yards. So what’s wrong? The civilian market has given us higher expectations at a lower cost, that’s what’s the matter. In this current marketplace, you can find many barrel assemblies whose manufacturers guarantee 1 MOA or less in accuracy. In this marketplace, you can find quality barrels from $120 to $235 dollars with gas blocks installed and accuracy performance that meets or exceeds the mil-spec criteria. The question is, are these cheaper barrels “combat” worthy? After all, that’s why you would buy a BCM, because you want a no shit rifle that’s going to work. Right? Don’t we all? The problem is, as civilians, we follow the mil-spec mantra and have done so for a long time. Now that the war on terror has slowed down, manufacturers have turned towards the civilian markplace by offering very unique, designer components and quality components that are affordable for the working man. We all want a combat ready rifle. The reality is that we won’t be capable of abusing a barrel like the military can. We don’t need 5.56 chambered chrome lined, CHF barrels for a reliable weapon. We have many reliable and accurate barrels chambered in .223 Wylde which is in many ways superior for civilian use over 5.56; it reduces the long throat and lets the projectile engage the rifling sooner and in a more consistent manner. It certainly isn’t mil-spec, but for civilians it’s a smarter choice with accuracy benefits. We also have Melonite which has been part of the drive in reducing barrel costs, yet giving us a very consistent, accurate product with a long barrel life. The game is changing. Melonited Ballistic Advantage 16 inch Middy If your rifle is stored ready to go, what is the likelihood that in the wildest SHTFantasy that you will be able to shoot out that barrel? In any circumstance where you may use the rifle to defend life and limb (or liberty), what will be more important, having a barrel with a higher degree of accuracy and precision to aid you in hitting your target, or buying a more expensive product that doesn’t deliver the degree of accuracy but promises maybe a few thousand rounds longer life? If SHTF did come, an accurate rifle and a competent rifleman could make use of that accuracy for not only self-defense at a distance, but that higher degree of accuracy may be the difference between hitting a small object (say a head, a small game animal, whatever) vs missing the target. I figured that if you had to shoot a target, with all your errors and stress from being involved in life or death situation, having an accurate barrel and consistent bullet will be of more aid to you than a less accurate barrel and a ballisticly poor cartridge blown about by the wind and hampered by inaccuracy. If all we see is a target which appears for a brief second, and we put that dot on it and quickly mash that trigger, I hope that not only is lady luck on my side, but that my rifle hit where it aimed, and my projectile not be pushed away by the environment. I don’t want a barrel to let a flyer go wide. I want consistent results from my barrel. As civilians, the accurate barrels being produced at a lower cost outweigh the benefits of going CHF, Mil-Spec Chrome lined, etc. At the cost of a few thousand rounds of barrel life, we get more usable accuracy without sacrificing reliability, and it can keep costs down. Having an accurate rifle permits us to enjoy a day at the range honing our small target skills as well as permitting us the greatest chance that our bullet will connect both near and at a distance if the time should ever come to use our skills in defense. I realize that the mil-spec barrels can hit a man-sized target, but we all know that men wont stand up in a field waiting to get shot. They will present a very small, mobile target, and we need rifles with the accuracy to dole out hits instead of misses. Wrapping Up: Accuracy and reliability can be had at a cheaper price than mil-spec barrels or other “hard use” military style barrels. The civilian marketplace has given us numerous options at a lower cost, and in the grand scheme of things, a civilian with an accurate AR15 has a rifle capable of wider use both as a rifle capable of hitting smaller targets, and as an accurate rifle for throwing rounds down range should he/she know how to use the rifle effectively. We are unlikely, as civilians, to burn out barrels to the point where CHFs long barrel life, will be realized. The benefits of a barrel which may not theoretically last as long, but which offers the shooter greater accuracy would likely be a smarter choice for civilian shooters. In some products, you can have both tight groups and mil-spec chrome lined love, so do your research. These mil-spec barrels will be ideal if the price is right and your research leads you to a good product, but smarter design and lower costs have lead me to jump ship on some of the mil-spec barrel mantra as the AR15 marketplace has evolved. The AR15 is a do all rifle. Take the best components you can afford and assemble them into a rifle that can, literally, do almost everything well. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

The 4 Best 200 Yard Scopes – Riflescope Reviews 2020 Photo by Jimmy Smith / CC BY Looking for the right 200 yard scope? That is something of a subjective choice, but there are factors that separate the junk for the gems. While it is true that modern manufacturing methods in China have allowed for a plethora of unbranded optics to flood the market, and it is true that generally those scopes are suitable for most work, we aren’t going to look at those. This is about the best 200 yard scope, not the best 200 yard scope for the cost of a case of beer. Instead we are juggling cost, performance, and quality in an effort to find a suitable assortment of 200 yard scopes for almost any purpose and pocketbook. Here are our reviews of the 4 best 200 yard scopes on the market: "200 Yard Scope" Contender 1: Bushnell Banner Dusk & Dawn "Bushnell Banner Dusk" & Dawn Multi-X Reticle Riflescope with 3-Inch Eye Relief, 3-9X 40mm Price: $87.61 Price as of 08/14/2020 14:46 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The lowest price offering in our reviews, the Bushnell Banner is admittedly an entry-level 200 yard scope, but it is a well built one. A fairly standard 3-9x40 scope, this optic is a prime example of how to make an inexpensive scope that just does the job. Built to be fog and shock proof, and made with multicoated optics for improved light transmission, this scope simply works. While it may not be a high grade sniper scope, or match grade optic, it is more that sufficient to take a 200 yard kill shot on game or to punch holes in paper. If your budget leans this way, there is no shame in running a Bushnell Banner on your rifle. Bushnell Banner 3-9x40 BDC Riflescope Watch this video on YouTube

How to get the most out of attending a Gun Show

Planning to attend a gun show? So you’ve seen the ads and your interest has peaked your curiosity. Gun shows allow local business owners and individuals to showcase their products and services to the general public. What does this mean for you, the consumer? It means you’re able to see a wide array of firearms related products and services in one location usually during a weekend. From guns to knives to accessories (oh the accessories!), to firearms instruction classes, – you name it, anything firearms related will be there. Before you go, here are a few guidelines to keep in mind. Gun shows versus trade shows There is a difference between a gun show and a trade show. A gun show is a place where local vendors and individuals can sell their firearm related products and services. Since they are open to the public, gun shows provide a forum where people can purchase, sell and trade firearms and related products which I’ll talk about later. On the other hand, a trade show is usually closed to the public reserved only for industry related businesses and trade professionals. Trade shows allow companies to showcase their upcoming products, which have yet to be released to the public, to media professionals. Also, it gives the opportunity for trade professionals to interact and share ideas among themselves. An example of a trade show in the firearms industry is SHOT Show. Security photo courtesy of contributor kconnors via www.morguefile.com. Fees and security Usually, you will be charged a fee to attend a gun show. This fee covers the costs to hold the event which can range from security, facility fees, liability insurance, etc. Despite the admission fee, gun shows can be an opportune place for new shooters as well as experienced shooters. Regarding security, through the years security has been tightened due to issues that have arisen from past gun shows. When in doubt, always be aware of your surroundings. All firearms will be checked upon arrival as well as bags being searched which is just a precaution like any other firearms related event. If you are bringing a gun to sell or trade, it may be “tagged” and safeguarded upon arrival meaning security may place a plastic device which may block the trigger or keep the slide open. Again, most of this is standard safety procedure for any gun related event. Image courtesy of contributor Irish_Eyes via www.morguefile.com. Carrying Before you attend a gun show, it’s best to determine their rules on carrying should you decide to carry at the event. Most times, rules are usually posted on the information website or there will be a phone number to call for more information. Find out the rules on carrying before you attend the event so you’re not caught by surprise. Photo courtesy of contributor taliesin via www.morguefile.com. Handling Firearms What I enjoy about gun shows is the ability to handle firearms without having to wait for someone behind the counter to unlock a display case. Most times, the guns will be displayed since all firearms are checked upon arrival. (Did I mention the heavy security?) Many times, you can just pick up a firearm (which usually has some kind of security mechanism attached to it which may be locked in place for safety reasons), and give it a good feel. Where else can you do this? Surely, not at a retail store since guns tend to be put away in display cases. When handling a firearm at a gun show (despite it being locked), always remember the 4 Rules of Gun Safety. Furthermore, if you would like the opportunity to dry fire a gun, always be sure to ask permission. Image courtesy of contributor pandpstock001 via www.freedigitalphotos.net. Exploring the Accessories Gun shows are a great place not only to view firearms but to shop for accessories. The list of accessories can be endless for a variety of guns. Before you attend, it’s best to make a list of accessories you’re on the lookout for and do your research beforehand. If this is your first gun show, you may just want to take everything in and get a feel for the event. Yes, it may be tempting to go out and buy everything in sight. Just be aware of what you need versus what you want. A third-generation 9mm Glock 17 with a cable lock. Photo courtesy of contributor Kencf0618 via Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org Trading and Selling Gun shows also allow you the ability to trade or sell your gun to the merchants there. Most times for gun enthusiasts, a trade is much more in order. If you are planning to bring a gun to trade or sell, make sure you know the rules for bringing it to the event. As previously stated, be aware there may be some safety measures taken such as security tying your gun not allowing the trigger to be pulled and/or keeping the slide open. Negotiating Along the lines of trading and selling, a gun show is a great place to negotiate. The business and people there are there to do business. They want to do business with you. If you’re going to be trading or selling, be sure you’ve done your research and be prepared to negotiate a fair price. Most times, these merchants know their stuff and are knowledgeable about the values of firearms. After all, this is their business! Image courtesy of contributor daisukerman via www.morguefile.com. Gun Sales When buying from a Federal Firearms License (FFL) vendor at a gun show, all federal rules apply including the usual procedure of running background checks. Remember, FFL dealers need to abide by the laws of buying and selling guns even at gun shows. Due to past events, gun shows have obtained a negative stigma of being associated with illegal transactions. With the security and precautions made, this is rarely the case nowadays. These businesses are on the line and surely do not want to perform a criminal offense. If you’re buying from an individual, state laws usually apply. Depending on the area, sometimes you may be able to purchase or sell from an individual without a background check. Be sure to check the laws in your area beforehand. Final Thoughts Gun shows can be a great place to see firearms and related products on a local level all in one place. It also gives you the opportunity to meet local business owners who may be able to help with your supply needs in the future. Whether you are there to browse, buy or trade, gun shows can be an educational learning experience for everyone including beginner and experienced shooters alike.

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